Sydney’s Hidden Gems

It’s easy to stay entertained in Sydney. The marvelous cityscape is brimming with interesting details to gawk at. While it is a rite of passage to visit the renowned landmarks like the Sydney Opera House, Harbour Bridge, and Bondi Beach, there are also a lot of “blink and you’ll miss it” hotspots in every nook and cranny. If you truly want to meet the less-witnessed side of this sprawling metropolis, here are seven of Sydney’s hidden gems that you can’t miss.

Sydney's Hidden Gems Chinatown Sydney

Observatory Hill Park

Angel Place

PITT STREET MALL & STRAND ARCADE

Randwick

WENDY WHITELEY’S SECRET GARDEN

MAHON POOL

Angel Place

In the dense and urban area of Sydney, you can stumble upon the incredible little gem known as Angel Place. It is an alleyway that can be recognized by a captivating art exhibit suspended high above the pavement: a massive collection of bird cages that are meant to symbolize the overwhelmingly big flocks of birds that populated the area a long time ago. It looks as beautiful and haunting as it sounds. The alleyway is also home to the famous City Recital Hall.

Observatory Hill Park

As a Sydney newcomer, you’ll likely rest in the lush green surroundings of the Royal Botanic Gardens or Hyde Park. However, these popular picnic hotspots have nothing on the Observatory Hill Park, which is a place that definitely should be more popular. After all, it boasts what is possibly the most incredible overlook view of the dazzling Sydney cityscape.

Pitt Street Mall & Strand Arcade

Shopping malls are the epitome of generic tourism. In that way, they tend to be quite similar to franchised fast-food joints. Sydney, however, tends to offer interesting variations on the shopping mall concept, and Pitt Street Mall is one of them. It is a bustling, vibrant place where the river of people from every part of the city ebbs and flows. The mall is an extremely lively hotspot, which is always in vogue. It also boasts the Strand Arcade, which is an arresting Victorian-style building between George Street and the Pitt Street Mall.

Wendy Whiteley’s Secret Garden

There are more hidden gems in Sydney than you can count. One that has its well-deserved place on nearly every list is Wendy Whiteley’s Secret Garden. This beautiful and picturesque patch of land is a sort of a tribute to Wendy Whiteley’s husband who passed away in 1992. It tends to be an “off-the-beaten-path” hotspot for most newcomers but has its fair share of followers online.

Chinatown Laneways

Sydney’s Chinatown is a kaleidoscope of neon-glazed textures and narrow alleyways lit with the alluring glow of lanterns. Both tourists and Sydney residents flock to this patch of genuine culture to revel in the exquisite traditional cuisine, but Chinatown has its fair share of intriguing secrets. One of which is the Chinatown laneways, which are a set of art-deco alleyways covered in jaw-dropping art.

Mahon Pool

The leitmotif of Sydney is its diverse coastline. If you want to skip overhyped beaches like Bondi and truly enjoy a hidden gem of a beach, head directly to Maroubra where you can plunge into the Mahoon Pool. The “pool” is sandwiched between the endless ocean and Sydney sandstone. It is surrounded by interesting natural rock formations that render the spot even more enchanting.

The Historical Facades of Randwick

The lush suburb of Randwick boasts captivating architecture and a long history. Not only is it a beautiful backdrop for your stay in this thriving community, but it also boasts a Victorian mansion, which dates back to 1888. Coincidentally, 1888 is the same year that the first piece of film was made with a functional camera. The mansion was built by the legendary contractor, John Walsh, and is listed as an important heritage site. After you spend some time entranced by the subtle beauty of this building, head to the streets of Randwick and uncover the long and rich history of this town. Each historical building hides countless intriguing secrets for you to explore.

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